6 Ways to Teach Your Children Gratitude

kids gratitude

This has been an unprecedented year for most Americans. As we approach the Thanksgiving holiday, some may be finding a lot to be grateful for– for example, the end of the election process, or remaining healthy through the pandemic– while others may have had a different experience and may be struggling with feeling gratitude. Sometimes having gratitude is something people have to work on, especially children, who are used to seeing the world with themselves in the center.

The best way for children to learn gratitude is having good role models. Seeing you express gratitude regularly goes a long way. Helping them see the world outside themselves helps build gratitude. For example, understanding that not everyone lives in a house or neighborhood like theirs, or that people in different cultures and countries celebrate and give thanks in different ways.

Here are a few creative traditions you can start with your kids to teach them how to begin to think about how their actions can bring happiness to themselves and others.

1. Start the day with an intention. Mornings can be crazy, especially on school days, but grab a second, at the breakfast table or in the car, to ask your kids to set an intention for the day. It’s OK if their intention is self-centered, for instance if they say they want to perform well at sports that evening. The point is to get them thinking about being intentional and learning that their actions affect others. Eventually you’ll likely see their intentions involving goodwill towards others.

2.  End the day with an expression of gratitude. Again, help them draw their thoughts to the world around them and how they fit in by asking them to state one thing they are grateful for that day. It doesn’t have to be big ticket items, like God, their family, or their best friend, in fact, it’s better if it’s not. Make them think about all the little things they can be thankful for each day.

3. Start a “highs and lows” tradition at dinner time or bedtime. Each family member states the best and worst thing that happened that day, or their high point and their low point. Then, take it further by asking everyone to “flip” their low point. Can they identify a silver lining in their low point. Is there a lesson in it? Or did their low point benefit someone else? For example, if your child’s low point was that they sat the bench when they thought they should have been playing, help them to see that it was someone else’s turn to have that high point.

4. Practice acts of service as a family. One of the best things you can do for your children is to teach them the gift of service to others. Besides benefiting other people, it teaches your kids that giving time and service to others helps lift them emotionally, so it’s a win-win! While it might be difficult to do acts of service physically during social distancing, you could bake cookies to donate to a shelter, write letters to residents of nursing homes, or offer to walk your elderly neighbors’ dogs.

5. Start a family charity. Kids love to save up money, and many can be very generous with their savings. Start a family charity fund and offer to match what your children contribute from their allowance, other earned money, or monetary gifts. Once or twice a year, decide as a family where to donate the accumulated funds.

6. Let them be secret superheroes. Have your children pick a person to be a secret superhero for. It may be a classmate, neighbor, or member of your extended family. Your child can write notes of encouragement or praise to this person, leave them small gifts, or secretly perform an act of kindness for them. The point of remaining secret is to teach your children that they don’t need to be recognized or rewarded for being kind to others.

Local Non-Profit Organizations:

Frankfort, KY

Shelbyville, KY

Lawrenceburg, KY

Georgetown, KY

Versailles, KY

*Don’t forget about our four-legged friends at the local humane societies, as well!*

16 Tips for Relocating to a New Town

relocating tips

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moving is always hard work but moving to a new town can be exceptionally hard, even when you are excited about your next chapter in life. As your real estate agent, I can refer you to an agent in your new town to help you find your new home, and also give you referrals for other services you will need, such recommendations for hotels, restaurants, child care, and pet boarding while you get settled.

To help make the logistics of your relocation as smooth as possible, here are some to-do items you may not have thought about yet.

  1. As soon as you know you will be moving, start to organize your belongings, getting rid of things you don’t want to take with you.
  2. Collect used packing materials like boxes and bubble wrap to reduce what you will need to purchase.
  3. Start packing items you don’t use daily, like family mementos, holiday decorations, books and décor accessories.
  4. Get an estimate from moving companies and schedule a tentative date with the one you choose.
  5. Visit your new town, if possible, and arrange a driving tour with a real estate agent that can show you different neighborhoods, shopping centers, and the locations of hospitals, schools, churches, and recreational facilities or parks.
  6. When you know what school district your children will enroll in, visit the schools your children will attend to meet the principal and tour the grounds.
  7. Once you know what neighborhood you will be living in, join Nextdoor or the neighborhood Facebook page to keep abreast of what’s happening there.
  8. Locate and pack your important papers and ID’s so that you know where they are at all times.
  9. If your company is offering you relocation services, make sure you know all the terms. Often, they will cover items you might not think about, like the cost of shipping your car or professional organizers to help you unpack. They may also be negotiable in what they cover.
  10. Save all your moving expense receipts. If you are moving 50 miles or more from your old job to start a new job, your expenses may be tax deductible.
  11. Make a list of services you need to terminate in your old town and services you need to initiate in your new town.
  12. If you have doctor, dentist, veterinary, or hair appointments scheduled ahead of time, call and cancel them.
  13. Remember to transfer subscriptions for things like magazines, food deliveries, and mail-order prescriptions.
  14. Change your delivery address on your Amazon, Target, Shipt, or other shopping accounts so you don’t accidentally ship items to your old address.
  15. Schedule an appointment to transfer your automobile registration and driver’s license if moving to a new state.
  16. Transfer your voter’s registration right away, especially if your move is close to a major election registration deadline.

Every Home Sold, A Pet Adopted

realtor gives back to shelter

I am SO excited to announce…

In honor of kicking off my 2nd year in real estate, I have decided to sponsor a pet’s adoption fee EVERY time I close on a property!

I always hate to see all of those sweet faces in the shelter and I obviously can’t adopt them all, SOOO this was the next best thing for me to help give back and support our local shelter.  Due to the circumstances we are dealing with today, I am unable to go to the shelter and video the animals to show you how adorable they all are BUT one day I will be doing that as a part of this decision.

I am SO excited to start volunteering my spare time and sponsoring adoption fees from my commission from selling real estate for the animals at the Franklin County Humane Society! 🙂

Spread the word and help me help those sweet animals by using me as your REALTOR®!